Coronavirus: Trial begins to see if dogs can ‘sniff out’ virus

Must read

Fugitive accused of killing his mother in 2002 is found dead in Spain

A man who had been due to stand trial for a second time accused of murdering his mother 19 years ago has been found...

Pixel 6 & 6 Pro debut Google's Tensor chip and new AI camera

While leaks left little to the imagination, Google's Pixel 6 and 6 Pro are now here; complete with the company's first AI and Machine...

Huawei Watch GT 3 boasts the series' most accurate tracking yet

The Huawei Watch GT 3 series builds on its direct predecessors, with two sizes, new designs and more accurate tracking Credit: Source link

Will Apple be the last US tech giant left in China?

As Microsoft closes down the main version of LinkedIn, Apple looks more alone in China than ever. Credit: Source link
StudentObserverhttp://www.studentobserver.co.uk
This is an online news portal that aims to share latest news about these topics "news, business, health, sports, technology " and much more stuff like that. Feel free to get in touch with us!

Image copyright
DHSC

A UK trial to see whether specialist medical sniffer dogs can detect coronavirus in humans is set to begin.

The dogs are already trained to detect odours of certain cancers, malaria and Parkinson’s disease by the charity Medical Detection Dogs.

The first phase of the trial will be led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, along with the charity and Durham University.

It has been backed with £500,000 of government funding.

Innovation minister Lord Bethell said he hoped the dogs could provide “speedy results” as part of the government’s wider testing strategy.

The trial will explore whether the “Covid dogs” – made up of Labradors and cocker spaniels – can spot the virus in humans from odour samples before symptoms appear.

It will establish whether so-called bio-detection dogs, which could each screen up to 250 people per hour, could be used as a new early warning measure to detect Covid-19 in the future.

The first phase will involve NHS staff in London hospitals collecting odour samples from those infected with coronavirus and those who are uninfected.

Samples of breath and body odour could come from a number of sources, including used face masks.

Six dogs – Norman, Digby, Storm, Star, Jasper and Asher – will then go through training to identify the virus from the samples.

The charity said the training could take as little as six to eight weeks.

Image copyright
Medical Detection Dogs

Image copyright
DHSC

After an initial trial phase of three months, the government will decide where it believes the dogs will be most useful.

One possibility is that they could be used at points of entry into the country, such as airports, to detect potential carriers of the virus. The dogs could also be used at testing centres, as another form of screening alongside swab tests.

More than 10 years of research gathered by Medical Detection Dogs has shown the dogs can be trained to sniff out the odour of disease at the equivalent dilution of one teaspoon of sugar in two Olympic-sized swimming pools of water.

Dr Claire Guest, the charity’s co-founder and chief executive, said she was “sure our dogs will be able to find the odour of Covid-19”.

If that proves to be the case, the dogs will then move into a “second phase to test them in live situations, following which we hope to work with other agencies to train more dogs for deployment”, she said.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionFrench firefighters are trying to teach canines to sniff out coronavirus

Dogs have previously been trained to detect malaria from “foot odour samples” – in this case, nylon socks worn by apparently healthy children in the Gambia.

Prof James Logan, from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said: “Our previous work has shown that malaria has a distinctive odour, and with medical detection dogs, we successfully trained dogs to accurately detect malaria.

“This, combined with the knowledge that respiratory disease can change body odour, makes us hopeful that the dogs can also detect Covid-19.”

The researchers have also successfully trained dogs to detect cancer and Parkinson’s disease in humans.

Credit: Source link

- Advertisement -

More articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

- Advertisement -

Latest article

Covid news live: Latest updates as Government ministers reject calls for immediate plan B measures

Approval of mix-and-match COVID-19 vaccine boosters offer convenienceShadow chancellor Rachel Reeves said the government should introduce its so-called Plan B to tackle the rising...

Covid passes: Ministers consider widening use in Wales

Welsh government "thinking about" changes amid concern about high levels of Covid-19, says minister. Credit: Source link

Covid: Labour calls for Plan B measures in England

But the chancellor says the data does not suggest "immediately" moving to government's back-up plan. Credit: Source link

Tesco say website and app down after hack attempt

Britain's biggest supermarket investigates a possible hack as shoppers are locked out for more than a day. Credit: Source link

Veteran Receiver Chris Hogan Retires After Successful 10 Year NFL Career

Last Updated on 24 Oct 2021 12:39 pm (UK Time) After a brief return to the NFL, this season with the New Orleans Saints, receiver Chris...